Tuesday, February 19, 2019

RIP Karl Lagerfeld


Gems from Karl Lagerfeld in this brilliant T Magazine profile:

"You are never happy in the moment when you ask yourself that question. So I don’t ask myself the question, which means I must be happy. I’ve been lucky. I didn’t finish school. I learned nothing. It is all improvisation. And yet I am not doing badly. Happiness is not something life owes you."

"When things are too positive and too sweet, it is very bad. Too peaceful is very dangerous. You fall asleep. You need to take care of your enemies. Your friends you don’t need to worry about.

"If you don’t daydream your life is a nightmare."

"I’m actually very superficial. And I work on that. I became, as you say, an icon — and this removed me from reality. I don’t go on the streets any more."

"[Alexander McQueen] was unpleasant and poorly groomed but I’m more at ease with what [Sarah Burton] does. Very poetic and very beautiful."

"In one trashy French paper they asked the reader, ‘Are you shocked that [your cat, Choupette] can make so much money?’ Eighty-two percent were shocked, so I sent the editor a letter saying I was sorry to find that 82 percent of their readers were envious people. What can I say? She is the Garbo of cats."


Photo by Jean-Baptiste Mondino for T Magazine.

Friday, February 15, 2019

Positive vibes


This asinine president is our country’s real national emergencyIn other news: we need more of this in the world.


Donté Colley is exactly who we need right now. (Fashion Magazine)

Thursday, February 14, 2019

Happy Love Day


Being deeply loved by someone gives you strength, 
While loving someone deeply gives you courage.

-Lao Tzu


At what age is love enthralling? 82. (The New York Times)

Wednesday, January 23, 2019

Read less news equals happy


I find there is a direct correlation between daily news consumption and my internal stress levels. Meaning: the more headlines I read (Trump! Russia investigation! Government shutdown! Transgender military ban! The economy! Immigration! Hate crimes! Global warming! Wars! Brexit! Aahh!!) the more I anxious and hopeless I feel. 

Let's face it - most of the news we read is negative. Maybe it's evidence of our natural negativity bias or perhaps we're evolved to react quickly to potential threats. Whatever it is - instinct or vigilance - what if being too informed is bad for our health?

According to the American Psychological Association, 63 percent of Americans say the future of the nation is a very or somewhat significant source of stress. Also consider that 1 in 10 adults checks the news every hour and 20 percent of Americans report constantly monitoring their social media feeds (exposing them to the latest "bad news," whether they like it or not). It's no wonder we're all walking around with a lot of cortisol in our bodies.

In the name of mental health, I conducted an experiment on myself over the holidays: a news blackout for one week. This meant no New York Times, no checking my social media feeds, and no initiating conversation about politics.

You know what happened? I made A LOT more space for things that contribute to my longevity. I got lost in good books. I flipped through my favorite magazines and looked at all the pretty pictures. I went for long walks by myself. I watched Christmas movies and snuggled with my kids. I enjoyed meals, unhurried and uninterrupted. I had deep and meaningful conversations.

At the end of my self-imposed news blackout, I noticed my spirit wasn't as agitated. My soul was calm, like still waters. Even physically, my muscles felt less tense. My shoulders were more relaxed. My digestion was better. I slept through the night. And when I "returned" to the world (you can't stick your head in a hole forever) I had with me that very precious mental commodity: perspective. 

Do you read the news every day? Does it make you feel worried? Maybe taking yourself off the news grid every once in a while would help you, too. Try it, and let me know how it goes!   


How about some good news? (Good News Network)

Monday, January 21, 2019

MLK Day


Perhaps it is easy for those who have never felt the stinging darts of segregation to say, ‘Wait.’ 

But when you have seen vicious mobs lynch your mothers and fathers at will and drown your sisters and brothers at whim; when you have seen hate filled policemen curse, kick and even kill your black brothers and sisters; when you see the vast majority of your twenty million Negro brothers smothering in an airtight cage of poverty in the midst of an affluent society; 

When you suddenly find your tongue twisted and your speech stammering as you seek to explain to your six year old daughter why she can’t go to the public amusement park that has just been advertised on television, and see tears welling up in her eyes when she is told that Funtown is closed to colored children, and see ominous clouds of inferiority beginning to form in her little mental sky, and see her beginning to distort her personality by developing an unconscious bitterness toward white people; when you have to concoct an answer for a five year old son who is asking: ‘Daddy, why do white people treat colored people so mean?’ 

When you take a cross county drive and find it necessary to sleep night after night in the uncomfortable corners of your automobile because no motel will accept you; when you are humiliated day in and day out by nagging signs reading ‘white’ and ‘colored’; when your first name becomes ‘nigger,’ your middle name becomes ‘boy’ (however old you are) and your last name becomes ‘John,’ and your wife and mother are never given the respected title ‘Mrs.’

When you are harried by day and haunted by night by the fact that you are a Negro, living constantly at tiptoe stance, never quite knowing what to expect next, and are plagued with inner fears and outer resentments; when you are forever fighting a degenerating sense of ‘nobodiness’ - then you will understand why we find it difficult to wait."

– Martin Luther King Jr.


How we talk about racism is wrong. (Kottke)